48beers



Draught

If you want food to go, please enjoy the pleasure of having a perfect beer to go as well, MexiBBQ's entire draught list is available in 64oz growlers to go or for the table. MexiBBQ will fill any Growler from any restaurant-

Have your own Growler? MexiBBQ will fill it for you. Growlers are good for the environment (promotes recycling). $3 1/2 Liter Draught Specials Daily.

Our Margaritas are the best in Astoria (always 100% Agave Tequila, house made sour mix and agave nectar). Brunch is more fun when your drinks never ends. Saturday and Sunday all you an drink special.



Belgium
With over 500 beers native to Belgium alone, Belgium beers...
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Belgium

With over 500 beers native to Belgium alone, Belgium beers offer such a varied palate of colours, aromas, flavours, presentations and styles that they rival any other beer producing country. They are more complex than the grandest of wine, and are more like wine then some wines (like Rodenbach Grad Cru with it’s cherry sourness, oak notes and delicate balance). Belgian brewers thrive in this diversity by maintaining brewing traditions that are specific to province, region or town, and have been for centuries.

Belgian beers are typically top-fermenting ales that are bottle conditioned, and contain yeast sediment (desired and undesired, regulated by careful pouring). Some have blends of many types of yeast, or even blends of young and old ale. And some are created using spontaneous, natural fermentation. The uniqueness of this diverse regional yeast is what imparts much of the Belgian flavour and aromas. They are unlike any other in the world.

Beer styles run the gamut, but here are some main ones:

(Oud Bruin) Flemish Old Browns: are light to medium-bodied, deep copper to brown in colour. Extremely varied, characterized by a slight vinegar/lactic sourness and spiciness to smooth and sweet. A fruity-estery character, with little to no hop flavor or aroma. Oaklike or woody characters.

Red Beers: are typically light-bodied brews with reddish-brown colours. They are infamous for their distinct sharp, fruity, sour and tart flavours which are created by special yeast strains. Very complex beers, they are produced under the age old tradition of long-term cask aging in oak, and the blending of young and old beers.

Wit (White) Beers: brewed using unmalted and/or malted wheat and malted barley and can be spiced with coriander and orange peel. These very pale beers are typically cloudy. The style is further characterized by the use of "noble-type" hops to achieve a low to medium bitterness and hop flavor. This dry beer has low to medium body, notable fruity-ester content.

Saisons: A sturdy beer that was brewed in the winter to be consumed in the summer. Close to being an endangered style, though there has been a revival in the US.

Lambics: With their tartness and complexities, they are a level above beer. Brewed with barley and wheat with a spontaneous fermentation these beers have to endure months or years of aging.

Gueze: A blending of young and old Lambics, then aged 2-3 years after bottling.

Faros & Mars: A blend of ale and Lambic, spiced with peppers, orange peel and coriander. Often candi sugar is added to the boil for a lighter and more drinkable brew.

Kriek & Frambroise (Fruit Lambics): A Lambic with the addition of fruit after the spontaneous fermentation has started, Kriek has cherries and Frambroise has raspberries. Other fruit lambics are produced these day also. Additional aging is required while sitting on the fruit.

Ales / Speciales: Unclassified styles of beer, often specific to region.

Golden Ales & Strong Golden Ales: pale ales (like a Pilsner) with high alcohol content (8% abv on average). Complex and strong, yet delicate with rounded flavours and big, pillowy, rocky white heads. Prime examples are Duvel and Delirium Tremens. Straight Golden Ales are simply lighter in alcohol.

Pils: very similar to its bottom-fermented Bohemian Pilsner cousin, light golden, crisp and refreshing. Examples = Stella Artois and Jupiler.

Trappist Beers: there are only 7 Trappist abbeys in the world. These monastic brewers produce some of the finest beer in the world. There are 6 in Belgium that brew: Chimay, Orval, Rochefort, Westvleteren, Westmalle and Achel (that until recently only grew fruits and vegatables). Koningshoeven (La Trappe) is located in the Netherlands.

Abbey Beers: beers produced by a secular brewer in Belgium or the Netherlands, on behalf of an abbey or priory. Definite Trappist influences.



 

IPA
One of the most popular beer styles on the market today...
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IPA

One of the most popular beer styles on the market today, the India Pale Ale (IPA) often saturates beer markets and beer drinker's palates with its sometimes over-the-top hoppy flavour profile. And, in the Pacific Northwest, it sometimes seems that that is all you can get these days. But what is an IPA?

First off, India Pale Ales are not native to the US. Nor are they native to India. The style originates from England, wherein 1774 the British Empire appointed its first governor to India and began heavy trading. Beer being one of the many items, was leveraged within the market due to its being such a necessity at the time, a staple of one's diet even.

In the late 1700's and early 1800's, coke began to replace wood as the primary fuel used to kiln malt at breweries and maltsters. As coke burning was easier to control and produced more heat than wood, maltsters found that they could produce a much lighter coloured malt that retained a higher level of enzymes. This increase in enzymes brought more yield out of the grain, or rather turned more of the malt starches into fermentable sugars. With the invention of these paler coloured malts came the birth of the Pale Ale, however these beers had stability problems when shipped long distances. So, based off of the Pale Ale style, English brewers in the early 1800's began brewing a more stable beer to withstand the long and rigorous journey to India. A common method was to heavily hop the beer and take advantage of the acids in hops which act as a natural preservative. The second method was to reduce the gravity (amount of soluble sugar in solution) of the beer as much as possible (via yeast), thus creating a product with much less residual sugars, which in turn would attract less micro-organism that might spoil the beer on its long journey. From this you were left with a rather light coloured, bitter, dry and higher alcoholic beverage - compared to other ales of the day.



Cider
Apples are not indigenous to North America, outside of the...
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Cider

Apples are not indigenous to North America, outside of the barely edible varieties of the crab tree and the like. Throughout history apples have been in the trail of civilization, dating back to at least 900 BC. Thanks to the Romans, and all of their conquering, apples were spread around the world - leaving not only a tasty little fruit, but yet another convenient way to produce alcohol. Orchards really began to flourish in Europe during the Medieval Days, when those keen little monks added this to their long list of resources for food and alcohol production. The same could be said for the early European settlers. When they first came to North America, apples seemed a better use for alcohol production than anything else. So, "as American as apple pie" should read more like "as American as hard cider". The colonials also embraced hard cider, as not only was it easier to produce than beer or wine, but it was quite the cost effective way to make their hooch.

Back around 1625, William Blackstone sowed the seeds for what was perhaps the very first American orchard, placed close to Beacon Hill. William Endicott, the first governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony, was a distinguished orchardist as was George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. As far as Johnny Appleseed goes, he was probably partaking of the hard cider rather than thinking of people baking apple pies. Cider was held in high regard right up to the end of the 1800's, but its appeal soon fluttered. Maybe it was the Industrial revolution giving the working class the thirst for light lagers? Prohibition? Or could it have been an aggressive attack from the budding soft drink industry and the likes of Coca-Cola? Hey add a little cocaine to soda and voila! ... a nice refreshing beverage without the alcohol, but still packing a kick.



 

Ales
Ales come in two sub-styles, English or American.The two are...
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Ales

Ales come in two sub-styles, English or American. The two are brewed to similar specifications, however the American Pale Ale has definitely set itself apart from many of the traditional and standard flavours one might expect from English Pale Ales. Most pale ales coming from Great Britain run a medium to high hop bitterness, low to medium malt presence, some caramel, buttery and fruity flavours perhaps and no higher than around 5.5% alcohol by volume. American Pale Ales mostly impart a higher than normal hop bitterness, flavour and aroma. Hops can be on the coarse side even in the aroma; this is from the use of high alpha (bittering) hops. Flavours should be very clean in the mouth, with no traces of buttery diacetyl and minimal fruity esters. Alcohol content is roughly the same (not exceeding 5.5% abv), although some breweries think bigger is better and brew bigger pale ales that venture into the IPA (India Pale Ale) style territory. The color will range from rich golden colour, yet some breweries go as light as a pilsner, to amber and copper hues. The yeast employed helps to set this ale apart from English Pale Ales also. Typically it's an American strain, sometimes called Chico, which is very clean with a mild fruitiness to help accentuate the malt and hops.

This straying from the norm stems back to the grass roots of the micro revolution, wherein back in the 1980's several Midwest and West coast startups gave brewing a go. Ingredients were pretty limited compared to today, so they formulated their recipes from mostly domestic hops and malt. Perhaps the most well known American Pale Ale is Sierra Nevada Pale Ale from Sierra Nevada Brewing in Chico, CA, who started back in 1981 with a goal to brew American beer with more flavour than the usual dull American Lagers that were available at the time. They've been doing a stellar job since. SNPA has been available in the Boston area for a long time and it seems that in the past few years it has planted a really strong foot hold on the market, especially on tap. Even your average corner Bud-Miller-Coors package store will carry SNPA due to its popularity.



 

Wheats and Whites
What is a Wheat Beer? Simply broken down, Hefe (yeast) Weizen (wheat) is...
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Wheats and Whites



What is a Wheat Beer?
Simply broken down, Hefe (yeast) Weizen (wheat) is of German origin and traditionally means an unfiltered wheat beer with yeast in the beer. It is often referred to as "weissbier mit hefe" (with yeast). Crafted with up to 50%-65% malted wheat, the remainder of the grist is malted barley. This addition of wheat is what gives this beverage a very crisp and refreshing profile. Hefeweizens are generally highly carbonated brews and when poured these magnificent beers should be cloudy (from the higher proteins contained in wheat malt) pale gold to a spectrum of amber shades, with an almost on the verge of overflowing meringue-like crown. This goes for most beers brewed with wheat as well being that wheat malted or raw are great for head retention. You can stave off an overflowing head by rinsing your glass in cold water first.

It is also customary that the sedimentary yeast at the bottom of the bottle also be decanted into the glass. Long, slender trumpet style glasses are the appropriate glassware for the style and are best for showing off the impressive head after a proper pouring. Try leaving some of the beer in the glass (about a half an inch), roll the bottle in-between your hands (to loosen the settled yeast), then pour every single last drop of yeast in your glass as here lies much of a Hefeweizen's signature taste, aroma and appearance. Traditional German Hefeweizen yeast strains yield phenolic smells and flavors, which are sometimes medicinal and/or clove-like. Fruity esters, bubble-gum, vanilla and the trademark fruity banana flavors are also by-products of the yeast's handy work.




Lagers /Pilsners
In the world of beer, plenty of drinkers wade through lagers and pilsners...
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Lagers /Pilsners



In the world of beer, plenty of drinkers wade through lagers and pilsners as if they are the same drink.

You can thank the bottomless dollars worth of promotions and hype from the big breweries that have nearly brainwashed most beer drinkers into thinking this by placing sick amounts of focus on brand name recognition rather than brand education. Little do they know that macro-breweries dilute and abuse these "products" with large quantities of rice and corn, in excess at times, and that both styles have very rich histories outside of the US.

One style that has yet to be desecrated with this kind of cheap minded ruthlessness is the Czech Pilsner, sometimes known as a Bohemian Pilsner. The birth of Pilsner beer can be traced back to its namesake, the ancient city of Plzen (or Pilsen) which is situated in the western half of the Czech Republic in what was once Czechoslovakia and previously part of the of Bohemian kingdom. Pilsner beer was first brewed back in the 1840's when the citizens, brewers and maltsters of Plzen of formed a brewer's guild and called it the People's Brewery of Pilsen. This was primarily out of frustration of the brewing scene of the day. The consumption of beer became more and more customary and drew a bigger demand, and a call for better quality was also at hand.




 

 

Porters and Stouts
No other type of beer arouses so many questions as to its origin
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Porters and Stouts

No other type of beer arouses so many questions as to its origin. What the hell is it? Is it British or Irish? How does it vary from the Stout style? What does the name mean?

Porter is said to have been popular with transportation workers of Central London, hence the name. Most traditional British brewing documentation from the 1700’s state that Porter was a blend of three different styles: an old ale (stale or soured), a new ale (brown or pale ale) and a weak one (mild ale), with various combinations of blending and staleness. The end result was also commonly known as "Entire Butt" or "Three Threads" and had a pleasing taste of neither new nor old. It was the first truly engineered beer, catering to the publics taste, playing a critical role in quenching the thirst of the UK’s Industrial Revolution and lending an arm in building the mega-breweries of today.

Porters of the late 1700’s were quite strong compared to today’s standards, easily surpassing 7% alcohol by volume. Some brewers made a stronger, more robust version, to be shipped across the North Sea, dubbed a Baltic Porter. In general, the style’s dark brown colour covered up cloudiness and the smoky/roasted brown malts and bitter tastes masked brewing imperfections. The addition of stale ale also lent a pleasant acidic flavour to the style, which made it quite popular. These issues were quite important given that most breweries were getting away from pub brewing and opening up breweries that could ship beer across the world.